Disaster Preparedness – Emergency Flood Supplies

By December 14, 2018Flood Info
Disaster Preparedness pup

Benjamin Franklin once wisely said, “If you fail to plan, you plan to fail.” That philosophy is just as relevant today as it was in the 1700s. This can apply to countless things, including disaster preparedness – in particular, flood preparedness.

While it may be hard to predict a flood, you can be prepared for one. If you have the right emergency supplies, your odds of surviving a flood will dramatically improve. Here are the supplies you’ll need to ride out the storm:

WHAT IS A DISASTER SUPPLY KIT?

A disaster supply kit contains basic items that you and your family may need in case of a flood. You must understand that roads will be inaccessible and public transportation will be shut down.

Prepare your flood supplies long before disaster strikes. You may have to evacuate without any notice, and you must be able to quickly and easily take essentials with you.

During or after a flood, you’ll need to have enough food, water, and other supplies to last for at least three days. First responders should arrive after the flood, but they won’t be able to reach everyone right away. You may get help in hours, or you may get help in days.

Basic services such as gas, water, electricity, trash collection, grocery stores, and ATMs could be wiped out for a week or more. Your emergency flood kit should help you hang on.

An important part of preparing for this type of disaster is having flood insurance in place before catastrophe hits. Neptune Flood, providing innovative, budget-friendly flood insurance coverage since 2016, will help you select a policy that can help you recover from flood damage.

HOW SHOULD SUPPLIES BE STORED?

Store all of your emergency flood supplies in airtight plastic bags. Then put everything in easy-to-carry duffel bags or plastic bins.

BASIC EMERGENCY KIT SUPPLIES

At the minimum, you should stock your flood kit with these items:

• Water — At least one gallon per person per day for drinking, as well as sanitation.

• Food — Pack non-perishable foods that don’t require refrigeration, preparation or cooking. You can bring foods such as canned fruits, canned vegetables, and canned meat. You may also want to bring comfort foods with you such as cookies and candy. Remember to stow a manual can opener too.

• Flashlight and extra batteries

• First aid kit

• Moist towelettes and garbage bags with ties for personal sanitation

• Whistle to signal for help

• Cell phone with chargers and backup battery

• Flares

• Blankets or sleeping bags

• Battery-powered emergency radio

• Cash, change and traveler’s checks. You’ll be unable to use debit or credit cards.

• Comfortable shoes

MEDICATIONS AND TOILETRIES

A more extensive emergency kit should also contain:

• Prescription medications

• Aspirin

• Anti-diarrheal medication

• Feminine hygiene products

• Laxative

IMPORTANT DOCUMENTS

You’ll need to take these documents with you so they’re not harmed in the flood and also because they may be difficult to replace after the disaster has passed. Be sure to protect them in a waterproof container:

• Deeds, stocks, bonds, wills, insurance policies

• Bank account numbers, along with credit card numbers and respective companies

• Birth, marriage, death certificates

DON’T FORGET YOUR PET

Remember to pack supplies for your pets’ comfort and safety:

• Medication and veterinary records

• Three to 7 days’ worth of pop-top canned food and dry food

• Food bowls

• Extra collar or harness and extra leash

KEEP YOUR KIT UP TO DATE

Supplies must be carefully maintained so that they are up to date and usable:

• Store items in airtight plastic bags.

• Change your stored water every six months so it stays fresh.

• Replace your stored food every six months.

• Make sure your pets’ dry food isn’t stale or spoiled.

WHERE SHOULD YOU KEEP YOUR KIT?

It’s impossible to know where you’ll be when a flood strikes, so prepare supplies for vehicles, home, and work:

• Home — Have your kit ready and up to date in case you need to leave your house fast. Make sure your whole family knows where it’s stored.

• Work — You may need to shelter at work for more than 24 hours. Your work kit should be filled with food, water, medicines, and comfortable shoes or sneakers.

• Car — Keep emergency supplies in your car in case you’re stranded. In addition to basic emergency supplies, be sure to carry jumper cables, flares or reflective triangles, cat litter or sand for traction, an ice scraper, and a cell phone charger.

Floods don’t announce themselves. They can strike quickly and with a vengeance. If you’re prepared with emergency flood supplies, you’ll have a better chance of riding one out.

A big part of this preparation is flood insurance. Neptune Flood provides affordable flood coverage that pairs innovative technology with insurance ingenuity. Please call us today for more information. The future of flood insurance is here.